Lam Cold

Connection? Adrenal Fatigue and the Common Cold

I recently received a question from one of my longtime readers, asking if there is any evidence linking adrenal fatigue and the common cold. This reader was diagnosed with adrenal fatigue several months ago and has been battling colds repeatedly ever since. Given the remarkably cold and wet weather the majority of the country is experiencing, I know from research and conversation that many others are also battling colds even into the upcoming summer season. So, let’s take a closer look at this issue and see what the research indicates.

Adrenal Fatigues BP

To begin, let’s revisit the basics around what we know about the common cold. Colds are caused by any one of a group of viruses. Mistakenly, many people believe that the most touted virus, the rhinovirus, is the only one that causes colds. In fact, scientists have proven that just over 200 specific viruses are known to cause a cold, with the rhinovirus accounting for only 30 – 35% of cases. American adults average two to four colds per the calendar year, with the average recovery period taking anywhere from 5 – 14 days. The viruses that cause the common cold are transmitted via touch with an infected individual, breathing in airborne particles from someone infected or touching objects that contain the virus (the virus can live up to three hours on objects like keyboards, pens, etc.).

Many in conventional medicine tell us that the common cold is just a fact of life. Eat well, wash your hands, cough in your sleeve and you’ll be OK. A closer look, in light of what we know about adrenal fatigue syndrome, yields a more instructive course of action. The reality is that there is a connection between adrenal fatigue and other illnesses. A compromised endocrine system, specifically one that features adrenal fatigue burnout, is an often overlooked component in the common cold treatment and recovery process. If you are someone suffering from recurring colds, have tried conventional prevention and treatment techniques, consider seeing a naturopathic practitioner or progressive medical MD and have your adrenal function tested. If tests show adrenal burnout, proper supplementation, nutrition and lifestyle changes will go a long way to keeping you cold-free in the coming year.