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Meditation for Heart Health and Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome Prevention

Meditation has long been considered a healthy lifestyle practice. Many people swear by its ability to reduce daily stress, improve emotional well being, and boost overall health. Among meditation’s many uses, meditation for heart health is coming to the forefront as one of meditation’s amazing benefits.

Recently the American Heart Association (AHA) reviewed dozens of studies on how meditation impacts heart health. The report supports the healing effects of meditation. With more than $200 billion spent annually on heart disease, it would serve humanity well to find inexpensive, healthy, and readily available alternatives. Meditation is rising up as a strong preventative to stress, which can not only prevent adrenal fatigue but may reduce risk factors for heart disease as well.

By helping to avoid stress and many several common disease risk factors, can meditation improve heart health and prevent adrenal fatigue?

Meditation for Heart Health: A Statement by the AHA

Introduction

In the Journal of the American Heart Association, a scientific statement was released entitled “Meditation and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association”. This is the first time the AHA has issued a statement in regards to meditation and heart health. The experts at the AHA have reviewed dozens of studies which were conducted on meditation. The studies reviewed covered eight forms of meditation, their effects on heart disease risk factors, and the recovery of those that had suffered heart disease, such as heart attacks. The risk factors studied included stress, smoking, high blood pressure, and atherosclerosis.

The ground-breaking review set forth by the AHA is an innovative scientific review that incorporates long-held beliefs about meditation’s health benefits with scientific research. The AHA’s findings may open the way to an entirely new field of medical developments for improving the health of the heart and body.

Conclusions of the Study

Meditation for heart studies

For many years, it has been speculated that mediation for heart health may be a possible alternative to modern standardized medicines and the new findings by the AHA show support for this ideology. Dr. Glenn Levine, Chair of the American College of Cardiology task force on clinical practice guidelines, says that the studies have shown encouraging results.

However, Dr. Levine also suggests that the data is not yet conclusive to recommend meditation for heart disease as the only way of managing the condition. Though the results were promising, Dr. Levine’s group still encourages using existing methods besides meditation for heart disease, such as losing weight, quitting smoking, and lowering cholesterol.

“Our clear message is that meditation may be a reasonable (additional) intervention, but we specifically do not want people to rely on meditation or other such adjunctive interventions in place of proven therapies,” states Levine. “Meditation should be considered as a potential lifestyle modification, but should not be used to replace standard and proven treatments such as smoking cessation, blood pressure control and treatment of high cholesterol levels.”

Many of the studies covered the effects of meditation on reducing several of the factors common in heart disease, such as meditation and lower blood pressure, meditation and lower stress, etc.. The studies do suggest that meditation at the very least reduces stress and blood pressure, which are both considered strong risk factors in general heart disease. Addressing stress concerns can reduce stress hormones which have been linked to higher risks of heart attack. Lowering blood pressure can damper the risk of general heart disease. Meditation appears to both reduce stress and lower blood pressure.

What You Can Take from the Report

Meditation can be included as part of your daily heart-healthy strategy, so long as you understand that the data has not yet conclusively proven that meditation for heart health has tangible benefits. The AHA and Levine state in the report that they believe people interested in improving their hearts health should certainly consider meditation for heart health, so long as they are also including other “scientifically proven” techniques to reducing risk of heart disease. Levine says “we are extremely encouraged by the findings,” and continues to say that more studies will be necessary to prove the practice of meditation for heart health works definitively.

An Introduction to AFS

Meditation for heart health and Adrenal Fatigue

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome or AFS is a condition that will likely affect almost everyone at some point in their lives, yet most physicians don’t even know what it is. The most prevalent symptoms of AFS are lethargy and fatigue, but they also include anxiety, insomnia, brain fog, and an inability to lose weight.

AFS is a condition which afflicts the adrenal glands. These glands are responsible for producing several hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol. These glands are also responsible for maintaining metabolic processes such as balancing blood sugar levels, regulating inflammation, regulating the balance of salt and water in the body, and controlling the “flight or fight” response which is brought on by stress or danger.

The most common cause of AFS is constant and unrelenting stress. The ability to handle environmental and emotional stress is a major key to survival. To cope with stress the body has a system in place, known as the NeuroEndoMetabolic (NEM) Stress Response. A major component of this NEM response system is the adrenal glands. Over the years, constant stress taxes the adrenal glands, which causes the glands to become fatigued, reducing your body’s ability to deal with stress and creating a range of issues. go right here

 

Lam Cold

Connection? Adrenal Fatigue and the Common Cold

I recently received a question from one of my longtime readers, asking if there is any evidence linking adrenal fatigue and the common cold. This reader was diagnosed with adrenal fatigue several months ago and has been battling colds repeatedly ever since. Given the remarkably cold and wet weather the majority of the country is experiencing, I know from research and conversation that many others are also battling colds even into the upcoming summer season. So, let’s take a closer look at this issue and see what the research indicates.

Adrenal Fatigues BP

To begin, let’s revisit the basics around what we know about the common cold. Colds are caused by any one of a group of viruses. Mistakenly, many people believe that the most touted virus, the rhinovirus, is the only one that causes colds. In fact, scientists have proven that just over 200 specific viruses are known to cause a cold, with the rhinovirus accounting for only 30 – 35% of cases. American adults average two to four colds per the calendar year, with the average recovery period taking anywhere from 5 – 14 days. The viruses that cause the common cold are transmitted via touch with an infected individual, breathing in airborne particles from someone infected or touching objects that contain the virus (the virus can live up to three hours on objects like keyboards, pens, etc.).

Many in conventional medicine tell us that the common cold is just a fact of life. Eat well, wash your hands, cough in your sleeve and you’ll be OK. A closer look, in light of what we know about adrenal fatigue syndrome, yields a more instructive course of action. The reality is that there is a connection between adrenal fatigue and other illnesses. A compromised endocrine system, specifically one that features adrenal fatigue burnout, is an often overlooked component in the common cold treatment and recovery process. If you are someone suffering from recurring colds, have tried conventional prevention and treatment techniques, consider seeing a naturopathic practitioner or progressive medical MD and have your adrenal function tested. If tests show adrenal burnout, proper supplementation, nutrition and lifestyle changes will go a long way to keeping you cold-free in the coming year.

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What is Progesterone?

Progesterone, along with estrogen is a hormone responsible for the monthly menstrual cycle in women. Men do have this hormone yet is not responsible for its sexual growth and development. This hormone is produced mainly in the ovaries preceding the woman’s ovulation. The sign of its increased production is marked with a slight increase in the basal body temperature, increased vaginal mucus secretions, and makes muscles in the uterus to have fewer contractions. After ovulation, if the woman becomes pregnant, the progesterone now take its role over the developing placenta until the second month of pregnancy. Yet if the woman remained not pregnant, its peak levels of progesterone tone downs just adequate for the uterine lining to slough off.

Progesterone

There is also another important function progesterone has for the body. It assists in the body’s immunity, stimulates the production of thyroid hormones, helps in the reduction of inflammation and swelling, and maintains normal levels of blood-clotting factors. It is also known to be an anti-aging hormone that secretes collagen for the skin, produced to keep the bones tough, and makes the nerves to be functioning at its optimum level. As the woman ages, its levels of estrogen and progesterone is decreased resulting in menopause. When there are lower levels of progesterone, it leads to higher risks of bone fragility resulting in osteoporosis.

Oral progesterone pills are also prescribed for women who have irregular monthly menstrual cycles. This allows the endometrial lining to shed thus regulating and correcting monthly menstrual irregularities. It is also known to help in the infertility therapy and treats bleeding disorders unrelated to ovulation. Many women have used this contraceptive for its effectiveness in birth control method.

There is also a form prepared in vaginal suppositories to prevent preterm births. According to studies, women that have a short cervix are very at risk for preterm deliveries. It is said that vaginal suppositories are inserted daily during the second and third trimester of pregnancy.

Adequate production facilitates normal functioning of the neurons in the brain. This hormone specifically protects the damaged tissues from brain injuries. It also helps in the reduction of swelling and inflammation that follows a brain injury.